Best Mobile Hunting Maps for Self-Guided Hunts on Public Hunting Land

Has your passion for bird hunting declined because you flush less grouse or woodcock? Do you need more pheasant or quail encounters to justify the expense of an out-of-state hunt?  You can increase your bird hunting success by finding more grouse, woodcock, pheasant or quail on public land in two ways: First hunt within their prime habitat – aka where they live.  Second, have a variety of different habitat spots to hunt for different times of the hunting season. Sounds easy, but as a hunter you know the time and dedication it takes to find new areas to hunt.  You can either spend hours researching or scouting public hunting land, or you can Hunt More Scout Less with Scout-N-Hunt Mobile Hunting Maps. Our maps work off-grid, no cell or WIFI needed.  We do all the research and scouting for you.

We have the knowledge, technical skills, and experience to locate and identify the the public land that provides the best habitat for the species you are hunting.  Animals need food, water and shelter to survive. Prime habitat has the best food, shelter and water for birds and other animals to thrive. For example, grouse thrive in aspen cuts that were logged 9-16 years ago. The new aspen shoots provide a tremendous food source and thick shelter from predators. Similarly, pheasants need low to medium grasses, fields of grains, and dense cover like cattails or switchgrass for protection.

Both of these examples are prime habitat for upland hunting birds.  Without our Mobile Hunting Maps you could drive around searching for these cuts and sloughs, testing new hunting grounds through trial and error. Or, you could hit the ground running by simply reading the habitat labels on Scout-N-Hunt, park your vehicle in the right spot, and walk with confidence into prime hunting habitat.

Our offline grouse and pheasant habitat habitat maps offer more than habitat labels.  We give you many additional features such as labels that identify marginal habitat, lowlands, wetlands and trail systems.

Our maps identify the different habitat grouse or pheasant will seek in different seasons and weather patterns. For instance, grouse use conifers for protection from the elements and predators year round in the same way pheasant use grasses. Grouse use lowland conifers as shelter to escape pressure or inclement weather while pheasants will use cattail sloughs. By identifying additional habitat features, you can plan and conduct your hunting strategies based on potential bird escape routes that will vary depending on the weather or time of year.  Easy access to these features, and more, increases your chances of having a successful, self-guided hunt.

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The cell phone screenshots below show some of our Grouse & Woodcock Maps labels. Each map has 10 primary layers and 21 sub-layers that can be individually toggled on and off

Public Land boundaries  displayed on the map with imagery base enabled

Boundaries are clearly visible on our hunting maps. They are labeled and color coded, so you accurately see your position is in relationship to the private land.  All Federal, State, and County lands are clearly identified.

Lands that are enrolled in “Open Public Access Programs” like Open MFL lands, Forest Crop Lands and Commercial Timber Lands, are identified and labeled, but will vary from state to state dependent on available data.

Prime & Marginal Habitat displayed map with imagery base enabled

Our habitat enhanced maps are designed to help you easily identify and locate areas to hunt by knowing the location of “Prime Habitat” before you arrive at your destination. Above is an example of Prime Habitat in red with gold trim for Grouse and Woodcock. The “Marginal” cuts are in maroon. By identifying the habitat that has just aged out, Marginal Habitat, you can anticipate the potential Habitat Shift as the grouse seek Prime Habitat. As Prime cuts age out they become Marginal cuts. Grouse will leave the marginal habitat to find Prime Habitat that has the needed stem density that will provide  food, cover and protection in which to live.

Wetland data and tag alders

Like all wild animals, grouse and woodcock need water to survive. Most likely you have hunted a creek bottom or targeted tag alder stands to flush woodcock.  Identifying and locating these areas in advance of your hunt will increase your success in finding both of these birds.

The tag alders in the above map are identified in yellow. These are a known escape route or resting areas when grouse feel pressured by predators or weather. By identifying in advance the shape and size of a tag alder stand, you can decide to hunt the whole stand or to target the edges for escape routes where it meets Prime Habitat (red).

Identifing the habitat that surrounds the Prime Habitat

The above video: Identifying the habitat that surrounds the prime cuts, shows you where you want to position yourself while bird hunting. Identify lowland habitat like alder shrubs and where this aspen cut is on Public Hunting land.

Public Land boundaries  displayed on the map with imagery base enabled

Boundaries are clearly visible on our hunting maps. They are labeled and color coded, so you accurately see your position is in relationship to the private land.  All Federal, State, and County lands are clearly identified.

Lands that are enrolled in “Open Public Access Programs” like Open MFL lands, Forest Crop Lands and Commercial Timber Lands, are identified and labeled, but will vary from state to state dependent on available data.

Prime & Marginal Habitat displayed map with imagery base enabled

Our habitat enhanced maps are designed to help you easily identify and locate areas to hunt by knowing the location of “Prime Habitat” before you arrive at your destination. Above is an example of Prime Habitat in red with gold trim for Grouse and Woodcock. The “Marginal” cuts are in maroon. By identifying the habitat that has just aged out, Marginal Habitat, you can anticipate the potential Habitat Shift as the grouse seek Prime Habitat. As Prime cuts age out they become Marginal cuts. Grouse will leave the marginal habitat to find Prime Habitat that has the needed stem density that will provide  food, cover and protection in which to live.

Wetland data and tag alders

Like all wild animals, grouse and woodcock need water to survive. Most likely you have hunted a creek bottom or targeted tag alder stands to flush woodcock.  Identifying and locating these areas in advance of your hunt will increase your success in finding both of these birds.

The tag alders in the above map are identified in yellow. These are a known escape route or resting areas when grouse feel pressured by predators or weather. By identifying in advance the shape and size of a tag alder stand, you can decide to hunt the whole stand or to target the edges for escape routes where it meets Prime Habitat (red).

Identifing the habitat that surrounds the Prime Habitat

The above video: Identifying the habitat that surrounds the prime cuts, shows you where you want to position yourself while bird hunting. Identify lowland habitat like alder shrubs and where this aspen cut is on Public Hunting land.

The cell phone screenshots below show some of our Pheasant, Quail & Sharptail Maps labels. Each map has multiple primary layers and sub-layers that can be individually toggled on and off

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Walk-in & public land boundaries identified 

Walk in areas are privately owned acres that state agencies pay landowners to open up for public hunting or access to public lands. Both Walk in areas and public lands are identified on all of our maps. You can easily see where you can legally walk to start and conduct your hunt.

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Crop data on property where you are standing and on the surrounding property

Besides highlighting Public Access, our western state maps identify the crop-habitat that is contained within the public land or walk in areas as well as the habitat that surrounds the public area.

Understanding what crops areas are available near or in any public access area is critical in planning a hunt. Upland birds will be in or near their food source, especially if they can quickly escape to cover such as pastures, grasslands, or shrubs. Pasture, crop, grasslands, and shrub are just some of the over 15 habitat layer identified in (crop) that surrounds any walk in area.

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Wetland data: Our maps identify sloughs and cattails

Wetland data is an important feature for western upland hunting. Our maps identify and locate cattail sloughs, thicker grassy areas, and potential escape routes for pheasant, quail or sharp-tails. These features are labeled shown above.

Moisture is key to quality food sources. If you know where rich soils surround a wetland area, you know the food source in this area will be of better quality. Where the food is, is most likely where the birds will be.

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Grassland, pasture lands & surrounding property data all on the same screen